106 Main Road, Walmer, PE, 6070

Consulting Hours

Monday - Friday
08:00 - 10:30
14:00 - 18:00

Saturday
08:00 - 12:00

After hours Emergencies
073 443 0582
*Surcharge Applicable

Saturday
17:00 - 18:00
*Surcharge Applicable

Sunday & Public Holidays
09:00 - 11:00
17:00 - 18:00
*Surcharge Applicable

Office Hours

Monday - Friday
08:00 - 18:00

Saturday
08:00 - 13:00
17:00 - 18:00

Sunday & Public Holdiays
09:00 - 11:00
17:00 - 18:00

All | Breeding | Dental | Diet | Disease | Emergency | Eye | General | Heart | Illness | Joints | Lifestyle | Skin | Symptoms | Worms

The canine and feline cardiovascular system

In this article, we'll explore the organs of the cardiovascular system, its function and how it works, as well as problems that arise in the cardiovascular system and how they affect our pets.

The cardiovascular system comprises the heart (cardio) and veins (vascular) that pump and transport oxygenated and deoxygenated blood throughout the body. While the respiratory system is responsible for bringing oxygen into- and carrying carbon dioxide out of the blood, it’s the heart and veins that circulate the oxygen throughout the body. Just like humans, dogs’ and cats’ cardiovascular system performs the same function, is also controlled by the autonomic nervous system and is also susceptible to disorder and disease.



The respiratory system of dogs and cats

Breathing is an essential function of life, but it is just one function of the respiratory system in our pets. The respiratory system brings air into your dog or cat’s body, humidifies that life-giving air, heats it up and filters it, and then uses the

Breathing is an essential function of life, but it is just one function of the respiratory system in our pets. The respiratory system brings air into your dog or cat’s body, humidifies that life-giving air, heats it up and filters it, and then uses the components of that air to energise cells and balance the body’s pH levels. It then removes the resultant waste products. All of this is done involuntarily – your pet doesn’t have to think about breathing; it just happens. 



Nervous system

The canine and feline nervous system

As we explore the bodily systems of our furry and purry friends, there is one system without which all the others would not be able to function: the nervous system. The nervous system consists of the brain, spinal cord and all the nerves and connective tissue that runs between them and the rest of the body’s organs. Think of the nervous system not only as the electrical wiring that powers the house, but with its own power source and smart system – the brain – that maintains equilibrium in every room.



The canine skin and coat

Your dog's skin and coat

Your dog’s skin and coat make up a multi-functional super system. They are a barrier of protection, a convenient thermostat and water meter, as much as they are a barometer of your dog’s internal health. Your dog’s skin and coat also function as his largest sensory organ, as well as a very important communication tool.

In this article, we’ll explore the structure and function of the canine skin and coat. We’ll suggest ways to keep your dog’s skin and coat healthy, discuss the symptoms of an unhealthy skin and coat, issues that may arise and when to see the veterinarian as a result.



The feline skin and coat

Your cat's skin and coat system

Your cat’s skin and coat make up a multi-functional super system. They are a barrier of protection, a convenient thermostat and water meter, as much as they are a barometer of your cat’s internal health. Your cat’s skin and coat also function as her largest sensory organ, as well as a very important communication tool.

In this article, we’ll explore the structure and function of the feline skin and coat. We’ll suggest ways to keep your cat’s skin and coat healthy, discuss the symptoms of an unhealthy skin and coat, issues that may arise and when to see the veterinarian as a result.



The feline digestive system

Your cat's digestive system

The feline digestive system is similar in form and function to the canine digestive system. However, there are some differences in their diet that account for variances in how they absorb and use energy, and how long their digestive process takes.

Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that in order to survive, they need a diet that is primarily made up of meat. They can eat carbs and fats, but their health will deteriorate if they don’t get enough animal proteins to maintain their energy, lean muscle, tendons and ligaments, fur, skin, nails, hormonal balance and many other body organs and systems. Despite around 10,000 years of domestication, there is little that has changed in their protein-dominant diet. Therefore, their digestive system is primed to ingest, digest, absorb and eliminate based on a meat-based diet.



The canine digestive system

Your dog's digestive system

Dogs require not only high-quality food, but – equally importantly – healthy digestion in order to absorb the maximum amount of goodness from their nutrition. Let’s take a closer look at your dog’s digestive system: the organs it’s made up of, how it works, how you can help your dog’s digestive system to remain healthy, the issues that could arise, and when to see the vet about your dog’s digestive system.



Your pets and the holidays

It's almost time for the holidays, which can really put a spoke in my pets' routine. What should I do?

Silly season has arrived, which means the end of the year is in sight. Some of you will be going away on holiday, some will have friends and family over to visit, while others may take time off work, stay in and get some much-needed ‘me-time’. Whatever your plans are for the holidays, they spell a change for your pet/s.

In this article, we offer a friendly reminder to be mindful of how the holidays may affect your pet’s emotional and physical wellbeing, and what you can do about it.



Managing your pets' anxiety

When I have lots of guests over, my cat goes into hiding and my dog becomes extra needy - getting under my feet while I'm trying to host. What can I do when my pets get so nervous?

The holiday season is fast approaching and while for many people that means spending more time at home with your furry friends, it also means that your and your pets’ routine is about to change. Perhaps extended family are coming to visit (or you and your pets are going away to visit them). If so, more people (potentially strangers) will be in your pets’ space; there will be more noise and longer days of visiting. Your pets are even sensitive enough to detect any changes in family dynamics – especially around holiday time!



Mange in cats

My cat is scratching relentlessly and has begun to lose patches of fur. She looks pretty unhappy. What can I do?

What is mange?

Mange is a skin condition that develops when there is an infestation of parasitic mites or an overpopulation of mites on or in a cat’s skin. The presence of these mites, some of which burrow into your cat’s skin, causes itching, redness, and other uncomfortable symptoms. As with dog mange, cats can suffer from different types of mange based on the types of mites present on their skin. In this article we explore the different types of mange that cats can get, how the different types of mange are diagnosed and what can be done to treat the mange. 



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After Hours

Emergency Number
073 443 0582

Contact Us

Telephone
041 581 4000
041 581 4267

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Fax
041 581 1179

GPS
33 58 672
25 35 227

106 Main Road
Walmer
Port Elizabeth
6070